Posts Tagged ‘htc’

T-Mobile has Pulse

I was surprised to find this morning that there’s a third Android handset making its way to T-Mobile. T-Mobile UK’s official twitter page posted a tweet about an upcoming handset called the Pulse (below)

tmobilepulsefront

Front view of the Pulse and its bespoke Canvas UI

It’s the first Android handset on T-Mobile to be produced by a manufacturer other than HTC. Instead the Pulse is being built by a company called Huawei. It’s also the second time in almost as many weeks that a new Android handset has been released on a network out of the blue (Samsung’s first Android handset, the Galaxy, is available on O2 now)

The Pulse uses the same QualComm MSM7200A chipset as the current “flagship” Android phone, the HTC Hero, offering 528mHz of processing speed. Further comparisons reveal that the screen is larger than the Hero’s – 3.5″ instead of 3.2″, and the Pulse has 2GB of on-board memory, which is larger than the paltry 288MB in the Hero; memory is expandable to up to 8GB using MicroSD.

The alleged 210 minutes talk time is pretty poor for a touchscreen smartphone, and there’s no standard 3.5mm headphone jack, which seems like a backward step for any smartphone in 2009. There’s a 3.2mp camera on the back, without an LED photolight or Xenon flash, so low-light shots are likely to be noisy. The camera features autofocus and video capture software.

tmobilepulseback

As you can see, the 3.2mp camera has no flash

In other news the Pulse also sports its own customised layer on top of the standard OS – HTC began this with the Sense UI on the Hero, and now T-Mobile have produced their own UI called ‘Canvas’, featuring up to 6 customisable home screens.

The Pulse will be the first Android handset to be released on Pay-As-You-Go. T-Mobile announced that the Pulse will cost £180 from October, whilst you can either pay £5 a month for internet access, or up to £1 a day depending on usage. This pricing doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me, so I’ll clear things up once I know more. Contracts may be offered but pricing has yet to be resolved. I think T-Mobile will have quite a lot of success with this handset on PAYG however, £180 on any kind of smartphone is a pretty good deal, the closest “smartphone” I can think of at a similar price is the 5800 XpressMusic from Nokia, and even then it isn’t a true smartphone, per se. It even costs £15 more on the same network!

In all, it looks like a very good, low-cost entry into the world of smartphones for the more mainstream audience.

The complete T-Mobile Android family

The complete T-Mobile Android family

Advertisements

Touchscreen Handsets: the Future?

This story posted earlier today on Gizmodo with pictures of what appears to be a new Android handset from HTC. Tentatively dubbed the ‘G2’, it looks to be the successor to HTC’s T-Mobile G1 released earlier this year.

htcg22

looking at the two side-by-side, you can see that the menu section at the bottom has had a redesign, and the bezel at the bottom of the screen has gone (I think the screen is the same size as the one on the G1).

You may also notice that it looks a lot more glossy and curvaceous compared to the G1. On top of that, they’ve decided to scrap the QWERTY keypad that was present on the G1, and, in my opinion, made it one of the main reasons in people choosing it over the iPhone.

The world of mobile phone technology hasn’t really been the same since that little-known company in Cupertino came out with the iPhone. It sold 4.4m units in the Q4 of 2008 alone, and it has quite an impressive share of the smartphone pie:

It easily claims over 25% of the smartphone market share – despite not having a QWERTY keypad and not even supporting Cut & Paste!

Ever since the phone came out there have been countless copies and some strong competitors, but none have gotten close… yet. This year Nokia are set to release their superb looking N-Series N97, and Palm surprised a lot of people at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this month with the announcment of the Palm Pre.

These two new handsets aim to achieve the best of both worlds, by including touch interfaces and QWERTY keyboards. But is that too many input options? It’s not so bad on the G1 because you can use the mechanical buttons for everything if you wish and it doesn’t feature a touch keypad.

Does the rise of touch interfaces on mobile phones mean the end for the traditional mechanical side of things? Will we only see more than three buttons on the high-end/business-oriented smartphones? If this is to be the case, then I think it’s about time that people looked for revolution, or even evolution, as opposed to blatant plagarism of competitors models.